evoSuite subject of UCLA study

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) recently selected evoSuite, a pioneering software for the Tourism Industry, to be the subject of the Global Access Program (GAP) through the UCLA Master of Business Administration (MBA) program.

Designed and built by entrepreneurs Roland Leemans and Henrik Arlund; founders of tourism strategy and technology firm RéserveGroup; evoSuite was born out of frustration in not finding the right product to fit their own tourism client’s needs. Responsible for developing the South Pacific’s first fully integrated online booking engine, Leemans and Arlund invested a further NZ$1million in research and development to transform evoSuite into a management super system providing tools for tourism operators to streamline business processes unique to their industry.

UCLA impressed by system
The global potential and innovation behind evoSuite had significant appeal to UCLA program selectors. Conducted through the UCLA Anderson School of Management, inclusion in the 2013 MBA program is a rare opportunity enabled by the Global Access Program (GAP) through New Zealand Trade & Enterprise.

RéserveGroup co-founder Roland Leemans;

“The insight gained through the UCLA MBA Program will provide a huge leap forward for our business. We are proud to have deployed over 1,000 evoSuite solutions in Australasia; UCLA’s analysis will enable us to now confidently tackle the US markets with our products.”

The UCLA program commences next month, when five MBA students, all accomplished business professionals with at least nine years commercial experience undertake the evoSuite research assignment. RéserveGroup CEOs Roland Leemans and Henrik Arlund, head to UCLA in July to meet the faculty and participants, and will return to campus in December when the MBA class present their thesis and recommendations.

As part of their research, the team of MBA students assigned to evoSuite will visit RéserveGroup’s headquarters in Tauranga to study the business model on site.

evoSuite subject of UCLA study